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Northwestern State graduate says degree will let her make changes in her life
May 09, 2012 | 629 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
NSU President Dr. Randall J. Webb, left, is with three generations of Northwestern State graduates, from left, Julie Evans, James D. Harris and Tamala Keiffer. Evans received a degree from NSU Friday in psychology and addiction students. The Goldonna resident earned the degree through the Center for All Louisiana Learners (CALL) Program.
NSU President Dr. Randall J. Webb, left, is with three generations of Northwestern State graduates, from left, Julie Evans, James D. Harris and Tamala Keiffer. Evans received a degree from NSU Friday in psychology and addiction students. The Goldonna resident earned the degree through the Center for All Louisiana Learners (CALL) Program.
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Julie Evans decided she needed to make changes in her life, and those changes could happen if she earned a college degree. Evans received a bachelor’s degree in psychology/addiction studies Friday through the Center for All Louisiana Learners (CALL) Program.

Evans, who is from Goldonna, is a third generation graduate of Northwestern State. Her father, James D. Harris, is a 1961 graduate and her daughter, Tamala Keiffer is 2007 Northwestern State graduate.

“I needed to have a change,” said Evans. “I have been driving a school bus for 21 years and there is something else out there to do. I needed a college degree to open some doors and I have the confidence to do it.”

Evans made the Dean’s List for a grade point average of between 3.5 and 3.99. She was a member of Blue Key Honor Society and Psi Chi, an honor society in psychology.

“I loved being part of the organizations,” said Evans. “They accepted me and didn’t treat me like an oldie.”

Evans plans to pursue a master’s in counseling or education at Northwestern State.

“I want to work with kids whether it is as a counselor, teacher or in special education,” said Evans.

Evans took most of her classes online at Northwestern State, which fit into her work schedule.

“I could study and do my classwork any time,” she said. “That way I could work, run errands and keep appointments when I needed to, yet still do all my course work.”

Evans worked on her degree for five years, taking 12 to 15 hours per semester.

“Once I took my first class and was able to do it, I told my advisor to load me up,” said Evans.

The CALL program is designed for the adult student to adapt to specific interests, backgrounds, time limitations and ultimate career goals. It is especially appropriate for mature adults with a clear focus and desire to pursue a distinct course of study based upon educational and work experiences.

The CALL degree programs may be completed online under the “fast- track” method or in a regular semester format. CALL fast track courses are offered in four and eight-week sessions which allow the student to focus on one or two courses at a time.

Degree credit may be earned through regular and accelerated online courses taken with Northwestern State; transfer credit; challenge tests; CLEP tests; military credit; Prior Learning Assessment (life, work, or volunteer experience determined to be college level learning); credit from other training or educational pursuits and other related activities.

Over the past five years, 390 students have earned degrees at Northwestern State through CALL.

For more information go to yourcallla.org or call.nsula.edu.

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